LIVE VIDEO: WUSA 9 at Noon    Watch
 

Black bear romps near L.A. but eludes capture

8:13 PM, Oct 29, 2013   |    comments
Julie Sone of KABC posted this tweet of a bear on the loose in the Granada Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles. (Photo: @Julie Sone KABC)
  • Share
  • Print
  • - A A A +
  • FILED UNDER

 

A black bear on the loose 20 miles north of downtown Los Angeles forced the North Valley Military institute to go on lockdown Tuesday as the animal romped freely onto a golf course and alongside backyard swimming pools in the affluent San Fernando Valley neighborhood of Granada Hills.

Agents from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, armed with tranquilizer guns, tracked the bear as it made its way across the Knollwood Golf Course and between homes, KNBC-TV reports.

The bear disappeared into woods around the links and evaded capture.

It was the second time in five months that a black bear has hit the links. Agents captured a black bear on the golf course in June and took it out of the area, KABC reports.

This time, the bear also showed up at the North Valley Military Institute, prompting school officials to order students to stay indoors.

"There is a bear in a tree in the parking lot," the school announced on its website. "All students that were here on time have been escorted to class rooms and are on lock down, students that were late are in the Parish Hall with Captain Diab and other staff. Everyone is safe and waiting on animal control to take over the situation."

The chase was carried live for hours by KNBC Los Angeles as police and news helicopters circulated over the area.

The bear apparently had a tracking tag above its left ear, NBC reports, indicating that it had wandered into an urban area before and run afoul of state wildlife agents.

There are about 25,000 black bears in California, living mainly in the mountains, according to the fish and wildlife office, KNBC reports.

The state's black bear policy seeks "to minimize bear/human conflicts and damage to private property while not significantly affecting California's bear population."

 

Most Watched Videos