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Senate bill on track for vote despite filibuster threat

6:25 PM, Sep 24, 2013   |    comments
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 24: U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) leaves after the weekly Senate Republican Policy Committee luncheon September 24, 2013 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. Sen. Cruz is leading an effort in the Senate to defund Obamacare. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 181888599 ORIG FILE ID: 181745287 (Photo: Alex Wong Getty Images)
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WASHINGTON (USA Today) -- Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, vowed Tuesday to speak on the Senate floor "until I am no longer able to stand" in opposition to President Obama's health care law.

A conservative-driven effort to defund Obamacare on a stopgap spending bill now under debate in Congress has raised the threat of a government shutdown Oct. 1.

Cruz and Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, have led the defund effort despite criticism from Senate Republicans who view their tactics as short-sighted because there is no chance of passage up against a Democratic-led Senate and Obama's veto pen.

Despite the Republican senators' efforts, the chamber is on track to clear a key procedural hurdle Wednesday to ultimately advance a stopgap spending bill that leaves intact President Obama's health care law.

"Filibusters stop people from voting, and we are going to vote tomorrow," said Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., on Tuesday. Cruz took to the Senate floor at 2:41 p.m., but under Senate rules Reid will be able to hold a procedural vote to take up the stopgap spending bill around noon Wednesday no matter how long Cruz intends to speak.

Adam Jentleson, a spokesman for Reid, posted on Twitter that Cruz and Reid had pre-negotiated the terms of Cruz's floor time.

The House-passed spending bill under debate in the Senate maintains the current annual $986 billion funding levels across the federal government through Dec. 15 but includes a provision to defund the Affordable Care Act. The Senate's vote on Wednesday would essentially clear the way for a final up-or-down vote by the weekend, but Reid is going to strip out the language eliminating spending for the health care law, which is why Cruz and his allies are using blocking tactics.

Senate Democrats also intend to change the time period of the stopgap spending bill to Nov. 15, in order to nudge lawmakers closer toward passing the annual spending bills instead of relying on stopgap measures. "The best way to stop lurching on this crisis to the next crisis is to get back into funding our government the way the Founding Fathers set it out, through the appropriations process," Reid said.

Senate Appropriations Chairwoman Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., said she will be seeking a longer-term resolution to the dozen fiscal year spending bills that remain unfinished. Democrats are also seeking ways to use the annual spending bills to turn off unpopular, across-the-board spending cuts known as the sequester for up to two years.

The majority of Senate Republicans have said they oppose Cruz's tactics on the stopgap spending bill, in part because of fears of political repercussions for being blamed for a government shutdown, which will occur Oct. 1 if Congress doesn't pass it.

The chamber's top two Republicans, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and Senate Minority Whip John Cornyn, R-Texas, said Monday that they will not vote with Cruz on Wednesday, a clear signal that there are the 60 votes necessary to move forward with the debate on the spending bill.

"We'd all be hard-pressed to explain why we were opposed to a bill we were in favor of," McConnell said Tuesday, noting that the vote Wednesday will allow debate on a bill that includes the defund language since Reid has not had the opportunity to strip it out yet.

However, Republicans continue to unanimously oppose Obamacare as a matter of policy, which begins open enrollment on Oct. 1, and are seeking other avenues to dismantle the law.

For example, House Republicans are working to approve a legislative package tied to a debt-ceiling vote increase expected next month that would delay implementation for one year in exchange for suspending the nation's borrowing limit through next year.

Obama has maintained that he will not negotiate on the debt ceiling because of the potentially sweeping economic repercussions that could arise from the United States defaulting on its debt payments.

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